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The end of NRV for closing stock (or not?)

Author: Joon Chong, a Partner at Webber Wentzel. The Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) has for the second time in CSARS v Atlas Copco South Africa (Pty) Ltd, confirmed that the net realisable value (NRV) method is not a suitable method to value closing stock for income tax purposes. The SCA referred with approval to its earlier decision of CSARS v Volkswagen South Africa (Pty) Ltd and held that the NRV method is forward looking, taking into account estimated costs which would still need to be incurred before the stock is sold. The Income Tax Act 58 of 1962 (Act), and calculation of taxable income, is backward looking. The reduction from the cost price of the closing stock should only be allowed in two circumstances: (i) when an event that caused the value of the trading stock to diminish occurred in the tax year; and (ii) when the taxpayer knows Read More …

A creature of statute: A decision about the Tax Courts power to increase understatement penalties

Authors: Louise Kotze and Louis Botha. In the recent judgment of Purlish Holdings (Proprietary) Limited v The Commissioner for the South African Revenue Service (76/18) [2019] ZASCA 04, the Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) had to pronounce on the South African Revenue Services (SARS) entitlement to impose understatement penalties on Purlish Holdings (Proprietary) Limited (Taxpayer) and the quantum thereof.

The Tax Dos and Donts of SBCs

Author: Esther van Schalkwyk , BDO Tax Manager. A Small Business Corporation (or SBC) may qualify for favourable tax treatment if it meets certain requirements in the Income Tax Act (ITA). The benefits, requirements, and common pitfalls are summarised below. Benefits Companies (including close corporations) are generally subject to a flat rate income tax of 28%. SBCs are subject to more favourable tax rates on taxable income up to R550 000. The SBC tax rates for financial years ending between 1 April 2018 and 31 March 2019 are:

SA Budget 2019/20 – Controlled foreign company comparable tax threshold to be decreased

The Budget noted a global downward trend in corporate taxation rates. This downward trend may lead to an unintended increase in the imputation of the net income of controlled foreign companies (CFCs) in South African shareholders taxable income. This is despite the fact that at the inception, the CFC may have operated in a jurisdiction with rates of tax which would have met the present threshold contained in paragraph (i) of the proviso to s9D(2A)(l) of the IT Act.

Finality to Debt Benefit Rules

Author: Siyanda Gaetsew. The Taxation Laws Amendment Act, 2018 (TLAA), which was promulgated on 17 January 2018, amended South African tax legislation by overhauling two provisions relating to the reduction of debt, (the Debt Benefit Rules), namely section 19 of the Income Tax Act, 1962 (the ITA) and paragraph 12A of the Eighth Schedule to the ITA (the Eighth Schedule). This article will examine the notable areas where the legislation per the TLAA differs and the importance of the timing of the application of such amendments.

The capital v revenue question in the context of government grants: The SCA decides in favour of the motor manufacturing industry

Author: Louis Botha and Louise Kotze. In the recent case of Volkswagen South Africa (Pty) Ltd v Commissioner for South African Revenue Service 80 SATC 179, the age-old question of whether a receipt is capital or revenue in nature was addressed by the Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA), in the context of government grants paid to motor vehicle manufacturers.

Is it time to lower South Africas income tax rates?

Author: David Warneke, Head of Income Tax Technical, BDO South Africa. A fundamental question posed by commentators around the 2018 National Budget was whether an increase in personal or corporate income tax rates, or both, would be announced. The consensus, which proved to be correct, was that such increases were unlikely. The main reasons given were that personal and corporate income tax rates are already high by international standards. Personal income tax rates, mainly due to the introduction of the 45% maximum marginal rate in the 2017/2018 income tax year of assessment for taxable income above R1.5 million, and also since relatively high marginal rates are reached at low taxable income levels, by global standards. Corporate income tax rates, as the rates in most of our main trading partners are lower than ours and globally rates are decreasing.

Reducing the cost of transfer pricing compliance for MNEs

Author: Okkie Kellerman (ENS Africa). Many countries have become more focused on combating tax avoidance. As such, transfer pricing compliance has become much more burdensome due to substantial documentation requirements and multiple filing deadlines. Multinationals (MNEs) have to take action to control their transfer pricing risks, but the cost of doing so could substantially increase.

Controlled foreign companies: look before you leap

Authors: Carmen Gers and Simone Krupanandham (ENS Africa). Section 9D of the Income Tax Act, 1962 (the Act) is aimed at South African residents who directly or indirectly hold more than 50% of the total participation (broadly speaking shares) or voting rights in a foreign company. A foreign company in this context is classified as a controlled foreign company (CFC). In terms of section 9D, the net income of the CFC is included in the relevant residents income in proportion to the residents effective participation rights in that CFC, thus resulting in the resident being subject to tax on such notional income imputed to it.

Revised debt reduction rules

The debt reduction provisions contained in section 19 of the Income Tax Act, 1962 (the Act) and paragraph 12A of the Eighth Schedule to the Act have been amended with effect from 1 January 2018 and are applicable to years of assessment commencing on or after that date. As a result of the changes, the ambit of these provisions has widened significantly, as discussed below, and the additional circumstances to the rules find application are worth noting.